Climate Change May Be Cause of Poor Cork Quality

Corkscrew and wine corks

Portuguese researchers recently discovered that rising temperatures and increased exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light brought on by climate change may be the cause of declining cork quality. The research, which was recently published in the Journal of Experimental Botany and reported by Live Science, was performed by a team led by Dr. Rita Teixeira from…

The 24,000-Liter “Wine Box”

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In recent years, the quantity of wine that is bulk-shipped in giant tanks from its country of origin to markets where it is bottled and sold has increased significantly. Most of this wine is transported in giant “plastic bags” known as flexitanks. To learn more about how flexitanks work, VINE TALK interviewed Alex Norton, Global…

How Rosé Is Made

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Rosé, also known as rosado in Spain and rosato in Italy, gets its color and tannic structure from the pigment in red grape skins. Any red grape, or combination of red grapes, can be used to make rosé: Grenache, Cinsault, Syrah, Mourvèdre, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Gamay and Cabernet Franc are among those used. Depending upon…

What Makes Wine Kosher?

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It is a widely held misconception that what makes a wine kosher is the blessing of a Rabbi. What actually makes a wine kosher has to do with the ingredients and equipment used to make the wine and who handles the wine. There are three requirements for a wine to be considered kosher. First, orthodox…

An Introduction to TTB

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Ever wonder who grants operating permits to wineries? Or who approves the designation of new American Viticultural Areas (AVAs)? Or who reviews and approves wine labels? All these activities and more are the responsibility of the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), a bureau within the Treasury Department which plays an important role…

Low-Alcohol Wine

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Have you ever wondered what “low-alcohol wine” is, or how winemakers can decrease the alcohol content of wine? Here is a quick overview of wine alcohol content guidelines, the factors that influence wine alcohol levels, and the dynamics driving demand for “low-alcohol wine.” Q: What is “low-alcohol wine?” There is no universal guideline that defines…

The Winemaking Process

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Here’s a quick rundown of the process that converts grapes to wine… 1. Crushing and Destemming: Grapes are fed into a machine which crushes them between rollers and removes the stems. The remaining mass of juice, pulp, seeds and skin is known as “must.” 2. Fermentation: Yeast converts the sugar in the must into alcohol…

How Sparkling Wine Is Made

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The bubbles that make sparkling wine so attractive are a natural byproduct of the fermentation process. When grape juice is fermented, the sugar is converted into alcohol and carbon dioxide gas. If the gas cannot escape because the wine is in a sealed tank or bottle, it remains dissolved in the wine—and then when the…

All About Cork

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Ever wonder where cork comes from or when it was first used to seal wine? Here’s some interesting information we learned from the Portuguese Cork Association (APCOR). What is cork? Cork is the bark of the cork oak (Quercus suber L), a tree that grows in Mediterranean regions such as Spain, Italy, France, Morocco, Algeria…

Mead

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Mead (“honey wine”) is believed by many historians to be the oldest fermented beverage, dating back to about 8,000 B.C. It was enjoyed by ancient people in Europe, Africa and Asia, and mentions of it can be found in ancient myths, folktales, hymns and sacred texts from around the world. To the ancients, mead was…